SAN FRANCISCO TOWN HALL

Friday, September 30, 2011

Thank you San Francisco for making your voice heard!

One hundred seven people attended the town hall on Friday, September 30, and participated in a robust discussion about the state of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States. Town hall attendees let their thoughts be known about the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, the Affordable Care Act and where the San Francisco Bay area stands in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment as the clock ticks down to AIDS 2012.

THE PANELISTS WERE:

Grant Colfax, MD
Director of HIV Prevention and Research for the San Francisco Department of Health.

Andrew Forsyth, PhD
Senior science advisor of the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health/Infectious Diseases.

Herb K. Schultz
Regional director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Region IX.

Charles Fann
Community co-chair for the San Francisco HIV Prevention Planning Council (HPPC) and Health Promotions Program and manager at Tenderloin Health.

Kabir Hypolite, PhD
Director of the Office of AIDS Administration for Alameda County.

Sharyn Grayson
Co-chair at Collaborative Community Planning Council in Oakland.

Marsha A. Martin
DSW, director of Get Screened Oakland.


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND FRAMEWORK OF THE DISCUSSION

San Francisco was the first stop on ROAD TO AIDS 2012, a nationwide tour engaging communities across the country in a conversation about the state of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in America. ROAD TO AIDS 2012 comes at a time of major change in the epidemic:

  • The United States is a year into its first National HIV/AIDS Strategy.
  • The pending implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), or federal healthcare reform, will change the way Americans get access to healthcare.
  • The XIX International AIDS Conference, or AIDS 2012, will be on U.S. soil for the first time in more than 20 years when it takes place in Washington, DC in July 2012.
  • Major advances in the treatment and prevention of HIV have improved the quality of life of people living with HIV and AIDS, while enhancing prevention efforts.
  • While science has led to breakthroughs, a struggling U.S. economy has led to funding cuts in HIV prevention and treatment programs on the federal, state and local levels throughout the nation. As a result, the very people who can be helped by the scientific breakthroughs are faced with socioeconomic barriers to the treatments that they need.

Panelists and Town Hall attendees provided their thoughts on the following questions:

  • What impact has the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) had on local communities?
  • Given the changes taking place in health care reform, what do communities need to do to prepare?
  • Given that the world is coming to Washington, DC in 2012 for AIDS 2012, what does the San Francisco Bay area want the world to know about the Bay area’s response and needs surrounding HIV?

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Epidemiological Overview1

HIV cases diagnosed in 2009

411

People living with HIV/AIDS

15,836

Race

13%

Black, Non-Hispanic

63%

White, Non-Hispanic

15%

Hispanic

3%

Native American

5%

Asian/Pacific Islander

3%

Other/Unknown

Gender

92%

Male

6%

Female

Transmission Group

3%

Heterosexual

73%

Male Sex with Male

6%

Injection Drug Use (IDU)

12%

Male Sex with Male / IDU

6%

Other

<1%

Transfusion/Hemophilia

1 UCHAPS.org, San Francisco Department of Public Health HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Annual Report 2009